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THEMES of Featured Ascent Lights

Reward for Selflessness
Somewhere hidden within our selfish motives, all of us have the proper selfless ones.
The Lubavitcher Rebbe teaches that because of Abraham's immense humility, he considered himself only a tool for performing G-d's will. His life's work was teaching G-d's Oneness to the world.

Since even the mention of Abraham went hand-in-hand with recognition of G-d, when G-d said he would make Abraham's name great, it was understood that through Abraham's fame, G-d was being made great.
Nullified to the One
When the body becomes the interface for spirituality, all the parameters change.
The people from Babel built a city and a tower in order not to become dispersed, instead of building cities and towers of holiness. With the first words of Lech Lecha, we are taught to build towers that serve as synagogues and cities which are places that teach and spread Torah values.
In the Land - in G-d's Hands
The purpose of Abraham's descent to Egypt was for the much greater ascent of his descendants.
The name of this week's parasha - "Lech Lecha" - literally means "Go to yourself", a reference to one's constant ascent from lower to higher spiritual levels as a person fulfills his purpose in the world. Just as G‑d told Abraham: "go to your source" each of us is also always trying to grow spiritually, even if sometimes we are not aware of it.
On the Road
Beginner
On the Road
Forward-thinking is the key to a happy future.
The Lubavitcher Rebbe teaches that due to Abraham's immense humility he considered himself only a tool for performing G-d's will. Since any mention of Abraham went hand-in-hand with recognition of G-d, it was understood that through Abraham's fame, G-d was being made great.
Stepping into Your New Self
One who is about to perform a good deed should do it with all their heart.
If choices are made in a context of absolute clarity, not only is the question of reward and punishment obviated, but the splendor of moral growth, consciousness and grandeur is emptied of meaning. We, like Abraham, are asked to step into the unknown of a new year - to arrive at a place where G‑d will ‘show us’ ourselves.
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