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Kabbalah teaches that G-d has very high expectations for very holy souls.
A person who has achieved the most spiritually advanced level of Neshama of Neshama is separated from sin almost absolutely, his whole lifestyle being one of avoiding even the proximity of sin. The Torah describes this as being "married", i.e. closely attached to his holy roots.

When such an elevated soul somehow commits a sin, the result is that it loses this "married" status, becoming "widowed or divorced", forfeiting the source of its sustenance from the world of Atzilut.
Holier Than Thou
We do not impose holiness on the priest; we are to see to it that he does not lose or abandon the holiness which is his by birth.
G-d allows His Presence to rest on the whole people only through the priests. When there is no priest there is no sacrificial service; when there is no Sanctuary, G-d’s Presence is not at home amongst us.
Death causes a form of impurity, a disembodied soul residue which may get in the way of a priest doing his duties, and so must be avoided.
As ministers of our G‑d, the priests are to conduct themselves in a manner reflecting honor and greatness and they should never become defiled by contact with a spiritless corpse, which is unholy and enveloped by the spirit of defilement.
Nation of Compassion
We should try to resemble the qualities of the High Priest.
Every person must make himself a servant of G-d and must sanctify himself so as to come as close to the sanctity of the High Priest as is possible. He should practice some solitude and avoid emerging from this communion with G-d to the extent his circumstances allow. He must be concerned that no blemish, physical or spiritual, should attach to him. His striving must be that he himself should qualify as an offering to G-d.
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