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Let not the previous and following enumeration of names bore the reader.

Many Who Came From Cain

Many Who Came From Cain

Gate of Reincarnations: Chapter Thirty-Six, Section 2

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After that, my teacher told me at length about many of the people who came from this root of Cain. There are others, but he did not tell them to me.

He told me of: Cain, Keinan, Mehalelel, Yuval, Yavel, Lemech, Issachar, Shelah ben Judah, Jethro, Nadab, Abihu, Nachshon ben Aminadav, Netanel ben Tzo'ar, Korach, Datan, Abiram, Pinchas, Otniel ben Kenaz, Karmi father of Achan, Shamgar ben Anat, Samson, Elkanah, Samuel the prophet, Aviah ben Shmuel, Chaver Hakini, Ya’el the wife of Chaver Hakini, Ephlal, Sismai the friend of the father of Sucho, Yishbach the father of Ish Tamua, Yashuv, Lechem, Jesse the father of David, Avishai ben Tzroya, Shima the brother of David, Do'eg, Achitophel, Aviah ben Rehoboam, Elijah the prophet, Elisha the prophet, Jonah ben Amitai, Chiel Beit Ha’eli, Navot Hayizraeli, Michah Hamorashti, Nachum Ha’elkoshi, Hezekiah the king of Judah, Menasha ben Hezekiah, Uriah the Kohen, Zechariah ben Yevarchihu, Ezekiel the prophet, Eliyahu ben Berachel Habuzi, Chananiah the friend of Daniel, Nedavia ben Yechaneyah the king, Aneni ben Eliyoani.

These are especially from the Cain root. Whereas others are either mixed, or are not significant enough to mention relative to and in terms of this aspect.

...reading and especially reciting the names of tzadikim...is a very great thing.

Let not the previous and following enumeration of names bore the reader. For one, reading and especially reciting the names of tzadikim in general is a very great thing. The whole person and all of his good deeds are included in the name. Tzadikim live in a super-plane that supersedes nature. Mentioning their name awakens their merit and can actually thereby make changes in the order of creation. (Rabbi Nachman) In addition, knowing about their root gives more of a handle to grab onto their soul and attach to it. There is much about most of these tzadikim throughout Rabbinic literature. The Ari.Zl. adds a major piece of information here that can aid one who knows the other pieces of the puzzle to put them together into a cohesive, unified picture. Usually, it is not easy to attain a strong link with a tzadik posthumously. However, the more one knows about the tzadik, and especially about his root, the stronger the attachment will be.

Also, we see how towering the Cain root is in this our Sha’ar Hagilglim. Reciting the order of names presented here helps to bring it to its ultimate tikun.

[Translation and commentary by Perets Auerbach.]

Rabbi Yitzchak Luria […Ashkenazi ben Shlomo] (5294-5332 = 1534-1572 c.e.); Yahrtzeit (anniversary of death): 5th of Av. Buried in the Old Cemetery of Tzfat. Commonly known as the Ari, an acronym standing for Elohi Rabbi Yitzchak, the
G-dly Rabbi Isaac. No other master or sage ever had this extra letter Aleph, standing for Elohi [G-dly], prefaced to his name. This was a sign of what his contemporaries thought of him. Later generations, fearful that this appellation might be misunderstood, said that this Aleph stood for Ashkenazi, indicating that his family had originated in Germany, as indeed it had. But the original meaning is the correct one, and to this day among Kabbalists, Rabbi Yitzchak Luria is only referred to as Rabbenu HaAri, HaAri HaKadosh [the holy Ari] or Arizal [the Ari of blessed memory].
Yitzchok bar Chaim is the pseudonym of the translator, an American-born Jerusalem scholar who has studied and taught Kabbala for many years. He may be contacted through: webmaster@kabbalaonline.org. He translated the Ari's work, "Shaar HaGilgulim;" his translation into English (but with much less extensive commentary than offered here). Information about his translation in book form may be obtained through www.thirtysevenbooks.com
Rabbi Chaim Vital c. 5303-5380 (c. 1543-1620 CE), major disciple of R. Isaac (Yitzchak) Luria, and responsible for publication of most of his works.
Rabbi Peretz Auerbach, originally from New York, has been living and learning Torah and kabbala in Jerusalem for 18 years. He teaches at Shvu Ami beit medrash, lectures in Kabbalah and chassidut at the Jerusalem Connection and Heritage House and to private groups. Rabbi Auerbach is also a talented musician. He is currently working on an all new translation of the Zohar into English with extensive commentary as well as a disc entitled "Music, Meditation and Mysticism."
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