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As a result of their sins, the limbs of each of them divided into 600,000 mini soul-sparks.

The Root of Cain & Abel: The Shoulders

The Root of Cain & Abel: The Shoulders

Gate of Reincarnations: Chapter Thirty-One, Section 2

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The size of the division depends upon the defect and the sins. Cain and Abel are the two shoulders of Adam, with Cain on the left and Abel on the right. The shoulder is the limb that joins the arm to the body, and it turns a bit towards the back from the top. It so being, as a result of their sins the limbs of both Cain and Abel divided up to 600,000 mini-sparks.

...Moses, who was from Abel, emanated until 600,000...

This is the secret of what is written in Tikun 69, that Moses, who was from Abel, emanated until 600,000 and his sparks reincarnate in every generation, in the secret of, "One generation goes, and another [the same one, i.e. sparks] comes [back]." (Eccl. 1:4) Understand this.

"There is someone who had [one comparable to all] 600,000 [Jews] in one belly: Jochebed the mother of Moses." (Shir Hashirim Raba) At one point, G‑d wanted to start the people over from Moses, (Ex. 32:10) for he is the grand root soul of his and all generations. (Zohar, Likutei Moharan)

His offshoots have to keep coming back to be repaired until the job is finished and all of the sparks are rectified. The necessity of reincarnation is according to how great the task is. Since Moses has the grand task of fixing the entire universe, his own perfection is not enough to prevent gilgul. It will continue until everything is fixed.

Understand how Providence is constantly setting up souls to reach their ultimate tikun through the reincarnation process. And make sure to use your lifetime to constantly fix things - and not for the opposite.

There is something unique regarding these two shoulders which depend upon Cain and Abel, and that is that the moach of da’at, which travels through the spinal cord, begins from these two shoulders. From there it continues downward to yesod, where it comes out as a drop of seed.

When the seed-drop goes from the shoulders until yesod, it is then called KPT/"kapot tamarim" [palm cluster - the lulav]... (Lev. 23:40)

There is a mitzvah to "take" four special species of vegetation on the holiday of Sukkot. The four species sometimes are collectively referred to by the lulav- kapot tamarim [palm branch]. The reason for this is that the lulav embodies yesod, the sefira that includes all the six of Zeir Anpin. (Zohar) The other species –- citron, myrtle, willow -- embody the other sefirot of Zeir Anpin. Together, they empower the lulav with seed/flux, which it in turn gives to malchut, in the unification.

And so they are waved out to the six directions, (Orach Chaim, Lulav) drawing flow from each one. Each time they are also waved in, representing the channeling of the flow into malchut.

This prepares the way for a full unification to be made through taking the lulav.

All this is done on Sukkot, the holiday that follows Yom Kippur, when the sins are forgiven. This prepares the way for a full unification to be made (Shaa'r HaKavonot Yom HaKiporim/Sukkot) - through taking the lulav.. (Shaa'r HaKavonot Lulav)

…which has the letters of KTP/shoulder. Once the two shoulders unify in yesod, by way of a drop from each of them descending to yesod, the following applies: "It [the ephod, worn by the Kohen Gadol] shall have two shoulder straps attached to its two ends, and it shall be attached" (Ex. 28:7) - the two are joined through yesod.

The garments of the kohanim [priests] in the Temple represent and draw down lofty energies. (Zohar) Wearing them and doing the service in the Temple makes great unifications above.

The choshen [breastplate] is the mishpat [judicial] root source worn by the Kohen Gadol [high priest]. It rectifies the power of judgment on all levels, from the leaders & judges to each individual in their own mind. The ephod is the power to implement in action: "And the ephod shall not move from attachment to the choshen." (Ex. 28:28) It must be bound to the choshen and never leave connection with it – one always has to make sure that action comes from true, balanced judgment.

Cain’s sin was a mistake of p'gam hamishpat [defective judgment]. (Likutei Moharan II 8) This test came to him from the place where mishpat [judgment] begins - da’at, which, after the sin, resides in the shoulder.

The idea of shaking the lulav is to draw the powers of da’at into the body, into each of its sefirot. This means drawing the ability of fulfilling what one knows into expression in every aspect of the self. In general, this is the dynamic in the crying the features the period of the day of awe. (Sichot HaRan) It all revolves around the theme of tikun hamishpat [rectified judgment].

The perfect unification is made in the self when a person fully fulfills in action the truth of what he knows in thought. This in turn unites the worlds above and brings a flow of unity to this world below.

This is the secret behind the concept-train outlined in this paragraph...

At that point it is said of yesod, "The thousand are to you Solomon." (Songs 8:12) Because Solomon, who [embodies] yesod, and is called "briti shalom" [covenant of peace1] totals one-thousand, or two times KTPh/shoulder. However, each shoulder by itself only equals five hundred, the gematria of the concealed letters of the expansion of ShDY [the Al-mighty].

Gematrias reflect the energies of a word. The reality of the two shoulders shining their power to yesod is seen through this that two times KTPh equals Solomon/Shlomoh - a primary representative of yesod.

There are many representatives of yesod. It is coined Shlomoh in Shir Hashirim [The Song of Songs]. This most holy of songs (Mishna Yadayim 3:5) was said about the building of the Temple (Rashi Shir Hashirim) - the connecting portal between above and below. The Shlomoh angle of yesod is its power to bring the harmony above to this world. As said, one can actualize this in life through da'at: When he implements all understanding of how to be into action. Then one has strong 'shoulders' to fully bear the burden of his tikun. If one will cease to indulge and instead work to supersede his own boundaries, the result will be transcending consciousness.

Cain is from the shoulder. G‑d said to him, "If you do well, you will be uplifted (above boundaries) - and if you do not, sin (limitation2) crouches at the door." (Gen. 4:7)

The two shoulders/sides of the mind bear the burden of understanding...

This is the significance of the "thousand" that are imparted to Shlomoh/yesod. They are rejoicing lights that come from the union of supernal levels which are brought together by our actions in this world. The two shoulders/sides of the mind bear the burden of understanding the spiritual and physical side of reckoning an issue. As mentioned, da'at unites them harmoniously. The word for thousand is ELPh/'elef', which shares the same letters as PLE/'pele' [wonder], a term for keter. Once the da'at does its thing, the way is paved for the revelation of the highest lights - keter.

The "thousand" also hint to the thousand lights that Moses received by the giving of the Torah. (Shaar HaKavanot Shachrit Shabbat) It goes part and parcel with the building of the Temple.3 "A prayer LMShH/to Moses..." (Psalms 92:1) LMShH is the same as ShLMH/Shlomoh – hinting to the bond between them. What Moses started by bringing the Torah down to the world, Shlomoh finished by bringing the supernal lights down through the Temple... "Anyone who has da'at - it is as if the Temple is built in his days." (Sanhedrin 92a) As mentioned, the power of da'at in Torah affords one the ability to implement all of these categories in the self.

[Translation and commentary by Perets Auerbach.]

Footnotes
1.
The unifying quality of yesod brings peace between the levels. “Solomon/Shlomoh” hints to 'melech d'shelama dilai' [the King that peace is His] (Zohar Shir HaShirim)
2.
“…and me and my son Solomon will be chata’im.” (I Kings 1:21) Chataim, usually translated "sinners", literally means "lacking/limited" as explained in Likutei Moharan.
3.
Even though there were a few hundred years in between, in the spiritual progression, one followed the other uninterrupted. For whatever reasons, there was a time lapse before it could unfold below. This does not necessarily intercept the sequential procession at all.
Rabbi Yitzchak Luria […Ashkenazi ben Shlomo] (5294-5332 = 1534-1572 c.e.); Yahrtzeit (anniversary of death): 5th of Av. Buried in the Old Cemetery of Tzfat. Commonly known as the Ari, an acronym standing for Elohi Rabbi Yitzchak, the
G-dly Rabbi Isaac. No other master or sage ever had this extra letter Aleph, standing for Elohi [G-dly], prefaced to his name. This was a sign of what his contemporaries thought of him. Later generations, fearful that this appellation might be misunderstood, said that this Aleph stood for Ashkenazi, indicating that his family had originated in Germany, as indeed it had. But the original meaning is the correct one, and to this day among Kabbalists, Rabbi Yitzchak Luria is only referred to as Rabbenu HaAri, HaAri HaKadosh [the holy Ari] or Arizal [the Ari of blessed memory].
Yitzchok bar Chaim is the pseudonym of the translator, an American-born Jerusalem scholar who has studied and taught Kabbala for many years. He may be contacted through: webmaster@kabbalaonline.org. He translated the Ari's work, "Shaar HaGilgulim;" his translation into English (but with much less extensive commentary than offered here). Information about his translation in book form may be obtained through www.thirtysevenbooks.com
Rabbi Chaim Vital c. 5303-5380 (c. 1543-1620 CE), major disciple of R. Isaac (Yitzchak) Luria, and responsible for publication of most of his works.
Rabbi Peretz Auerbach, originally from New York, has been living and learning Torah and kabbala in Jerusalem for 18 years. He teaches at Shvu Ami beit medrash, lectures in Kabbalah and chassidut at the Jerusalem Connection and Heritage House and to private groups. Rabbi Auerbach is also a talented musician. He is currently working on an all new translation of the Zohar into English with extensive commentary as well as a disc entitled "Music, Meditation and Mysticism."
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